The Power of Positive Criticism–Top 10 Tips That Will Help You Harness The Power of Positive Criticism

Posted on July 24, 2008. Filed under: -- Book Summaries, -- Uncategorized | Tags: , |


By Molly Malone

Not many people know this, but I don’t have a TV. Haven’t had one in years actually. Instead, I read a lot of non-fiction and watch things on my laptop when needed. I have plenty of friends that have TVs should I need one, but I have yet to find myself seeking them out to watch the newest American Idol. Somehow I’m able to resist. 

Anyhoot, I recently just plowed through the book The Power of Positive Criticism by Hendrie Weisinger. It was an easy read for me and thought I’d share with you and summarize the Top 10 tips that Sir Weisinger claims will help you harness the power of positive criticism, which are based on 3 sources–research, theories, and clinical experiences. 

Weisinger also says that these tips can be used for both giving and receiving crisitscm although some may be geared more one way than the other.

Anyway, here are the Top 10 Tips he has for all of us out there:

1. Befriend Criticsm- He says it comes with the job. He then adds that we all need evaluative information and know how we are doing. It’s information that can help us grow. 

2. Criticize Strategically- He says that people who consistently tap into the power of positive criticism are strategic: They actively take responsibility for how they communicate and see themselves as a directive force, with the goal being to get their recipient to take their criticism productively.

Ask yourself these questions before you try and use the power of criticism:

– Exactly what do you want to communicate?

– What do I want to change?

– What are my motives for expressing this criticism

– What specific solutions and goals can I offer and what can I do to help the person achieve these goals?

3. Be Improvement-Oriented.

4. Protect the Self-Esteem.

5. Choose the right words.

6. Criticize your criticisms.

7. Involve your recipient.

8. Remember the merits…without the “But”

9. Tell them what you want.

10. Be timing-oriented.

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